SELENE PHOTOMETRIC SCANNER

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The Selene Stereo Photometric System installed in Oxford © Bodleian Libraries

© Matt Marshall

Since 2017, Factum Foundation has been developing a new surface scanning system and workflow designed specifically for the fine surface texture of flat or semi-flat surfaces such as paintings, murals or sculptural bas-reliefs. While the Lucida 3D Scanner still produces the highest level of detail, the Photometric Stereo Scanner has the additional advantage of acquiring both surface information and colour at the same time. 

The scanner is based on a technique known as photometric stereo: by using 2D images taken under several different lighting angles, it is possible to extract very detailed information about the surface of an object.
It integrates various inputs from non-contact recording technologies, such as photogrammetry, and Factum Arte's expertise in the field of innovation. The four flashes are the same type conceived by Manuel Franquelo for the Veronica Chorographic Scanner and synchronised via a custom electronic board (designed by Jorge Cano) to a mirrorless camera. The motorised unit is capable of adjusting the position of the scanner over the object, creating a fast and portable device that is easy to operate. 

First recording tests with the 'standard board'. It contains types of surfaces that commercial 3D scanning systems find difficult to capture © Otto Lowe for Factum Foundation

Abhijit Dhanda working on the first prototype scanner © Otto Lowe for Factum Foundation

Enrique Esteban working on the photometric scanner © Otto Lowe for Factum Foundation

The second prototype © Oak Taylor-Smith for Factum Arte

Jorge Cano working on the second prototype © Oak Taylor-Smith for Factum Arte

Tests over a copper plate © Factum Arte

Lucida 3D Scanner test © Factum Arte

Selene Photometric Scanner test © Factum Arte

Detail comparison of surface information and colour acquired by Selene © Factum Arte

Colour information on a test painting © Factum Arte

Shaded render of the surface of the test painting © Factum Arte

Colour information on a test copper plate from the Bodleian Libraries © Factum Arte

Shaded render of the surface of a copper plate © Factum Arte

Colour information on a test copper plate from the Bodleian Libraries © Factum Arte

Shaded render of the surface of a copper plate © Factum Arte

Test on one of the Sanskrit palm leaf manuscript from the Bodleian Libraries © Factum Arte

Shaded render of the surface of a Sanskrit palm leaf manuscript from the Bodleian Libraries © Factum Arte


For more information about our new technologies for cultural heritage digitisation contact info@factumfoundation.org

Team:

The project is being developed by Jorge Cano and Enrique Esteban from the Engineering Department at Factum Foundation and Abhijit Dhanda from the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) at Carleton University, Canada. Adam Weigert from CIMS has also made significant contributions to the development. Funding from the Carleton side has been supported by the NSERC Create Heritage Engineering and New Paradigms New Tools grants.

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