News


total_registros:14
Save the Whitechapel Bell Foundry
Save the Whitechapel Bell Foundry

We need your help!

The Whitechapel Bell Foundry was the oldest continuous manufacturing business in Great Britain until its closure in 2017, a history of traditional bell casting that stretched back almost 450 years to 1570, counting Big Ben and the Liberty Bell amongst its extraordinary legacy.

Sold to Raycliff Capital due to financial pressure in an industry on the decline in the modern age, the US property developers have submitted plans to turn the historic foundry into a ‘bell-themed boutique hotel’; a complete disregard for the rich heritage of one of the UK’s finest cultural and historical assets, and for its rightful function as a bell foundry.

Factum Foundation have partnered with the United Kingdom Historic Preservation Trust on a plan to re-open the foundry, re-equipped for the production of bells and art casting once again, which can be read in full here. You can help save the Whitechapel Bell Foundry by taking a moment to submit an objection to the boutique hotel proposal to the Tower Hamlets council. Information on how to do so can be found here.


The 'Virgen de las Nieves' of La Palma
The 'Virgen de las Nieves' of La Palma

In February 2019, the facsimile of a terracotta icon of the ‘Virgin de las Nieves’ produced by Factum Arte, alongside a protective shell for the original, was officially inaugurated and presented by the governing council to the people of the westernmost Canary Island, La Palma. Every five years, this small figure of the Virgin Mary is at the centre of the Fiestas Lustrales de la Bajada, a deeply traditional celebration involving the island’s patron saint being taken from its display as the Royal Sanctuary’s altar centrepiece into the capital Santa Cruz de la Palma, whereby it is publicly adored.

Centuries of this form of worship had had a detrimental effect on the fragile sculpture, leading to the council commissioning a facsimile which was in turn used to create the protective shell; this was formed in fireproof epoxy resin and glass fibre tissue together with a soft inner and frontal padding to provide complete protection for the icon.

This project has been essential to not only ensuring the long-term survival of the figure itself but also the continuation of this passionate expression of veneration by the people of La Palma.


Bando Lucida 2019, presented by Open Care and Factum Foundation
Bando Lucida 2019, presented by Open Care and Factum Foundation

On the 29th January, Factum Foundation co-hosted the Open Care conference alongside the Italian art restoration experts at their Milanese laboratory, marking the second edition of the Bando Lucida initiative. This scheme aimed to return a deteriorated work of art to public use through supporting its restoration as assisted by Factum’s Lucida 3D Scanner, with the selection of the endangered piece carried out by an independent specialist committee; the previous winner, the Angelo Annunciante by Gaudenzio Ferrari, was presented in its restored state at the conference. This restoration process that took place at Open Care was explored alongside a series of talks, including one by Guendalina Damone from Factum’s Lucida Lab Milano.

Find more details about the event here.

© Open Care - Servizi per l'Arte


Back to Work in Luxor
Back to Work in Luxor

Factum Foundation are pleased to announce that work is now restarting on the tomb of Seti I, a critical step in completing one of the central goals of the Theban Necropolis Preservation Initiative: to record and re-materialise the entire ancient site. We are also happy to announce the opening of the 3D Scanning, Training and Archiving Centre in Stoppelaëre House at the entrance to the Valley of the Kings. This landmark building was fully restored by Tarek Waly Centre for Architecture and Heritage and Factum Foundation and formally opened by Khaled El Enany, the Minister of Antiquities and Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO in February 2017.

The partnership between Factum Foundation and the University of Basel, working under the supervision of the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, aims to safeguard the tombs of the Theban Necropolis through the direct application of digital technologies and the transfer of skills and equipment to a local team. The development of local skills and economy is vital for the recording and preservation of cultural heritage.

The 3D Scanning, Training and Archiving Centre is being run by Aliaa Ismail. The first two fully trained operators, Abdel Raheem Ghaba and Mahmoud Salem will now start the training of Amany Hassan Mohamed Ahmed and Mahmoud Abdullah Attalh Mohamed selected from 26 applicants proposed by the Ministry. They will transfer the skills necessary for digital preservation, such as high-resolution scanning, composite photography, data processing and archiving. This will be done with the support of Factum Foundation.


The Lucida Lab Milano recording J. B. Jackson's Chiaroscuro woodcuts
The Lucida Lab Milano recording J. B. Jackson's Chiaroscuro woodcuts

A team from the Lucida Lab Milano started the recording of J. B. Jackson's Chiaroscuro woodcuts, in Palazzo Sturm, Bassano del Grappa's Civic Museum. Palazzo Sturm is one of the few museums in Italy dedicated to showing every aspect of Remondini’s industrial process within the 16th and 17th centuries as well as the phases in the production of books, decorated papers, religious and popular print makings, games, optical views, etchings and woodcuts.

Read more about the Lucida Lab Milano.


Fitch Colloqium 2019
Fitch Colloqium 2019

On February 15th, Factum Foundation’s Carlos Bayod participated at the Fitch Colloqium; a conference hosted by Columbia University GSAPP’s Historical Preservation Programme that explored the future of historical preservation through focusing on experimental approaches to digital documentation, analysis, archiving, sharing, visualisation and re-materialisation of data.

The symposium examined cutting-edge processes involving the development and application of digital tools to projects of all scales, including high-resolution 3D scanning; an area in which Bayod, Ajunct Assistant Professor at GSAPP, lent his expertise.


Final Review session for the Advanced Preservation Technology Studio at Columbia University
Final Review session for the Advanced Preservation Technology Studio at Columbia University

In 2018, Adam Lowe and Carlos Bayod's course within GSAPP 's Studio on Advanced Preservation Technology programme, at Columbia University, was based on the application of non-contact digital recording systems within the frame of a fieldwork project: the documentation of the great Casa de Pilatos in Seville.

During an intensive 3-day session in October, the students carried out the recording of a selection of art and architecture elements throughout the building. The students had the opportunity to receive on-site training by scanning specialists from Factum Foundation, working in groups so as to obtain high quality information on the current conservation state of the palace.

The obtained data was processed by the students with the aim of generating virtual and physical outputs that could ultimately contribute to the appreciation and dissemination of Casa de Pilatos. During the final review that took place in December, the students presented their research on the conservation of tiles in Casa Pilatos. On this occasion, several renders, multi-layered online browsers, Océ elevated prints 3D models and milled relief prototypes were displayed at the University, along with the video made during the recording session in Seville.


In collaboration with Océ: digitising and rematerialising Rembrandt's ‘Portrait of an Elderly Man’
In collaboration with Océ: digitising and rematerialising Rembrandt's ‘Portrait of an Elderly Man’

Factum Foundation has combined with long-time collaborators Océ for the recording of a piece by the Dutch master Rembrandt, ‘Portrait of an Elderly Man’, held at the Mauritshuis Museum in The Hague, Netherlands. This extremely high-resolution, complete non-contact method will result in the creation of 3D reproductions of the painting using Océ's Elevated Printing Technology which will form part of the museum’s upcoming interactive exhibition ‘Rembrandt for Families’ (working title) launching next year.

Image © Clemens Weijkamp, Océ


Caravaggio's 'Nativity'
Caravaggio's 'Nativity'

In 2015, a facsimile created by the foundation's sister company Factum Arte of the renowned stolen work by the Italian master Caravaggio was unveiled in its original location at the Oratory of San Lorenzo in Palermo as part of the chapel's restoration.

The modern history and potential future of the lost piece is detailed in a new article from The Guardian featuring the facsimile and our director Adam Lowe that can be found here, whilst further information on Factum Arte's facsimile can be found here.


The Re-Opening of the Cast Courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London
The Re-Opening of the Cast Courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The Cast Courts at the V&A reopened this November following a long refurbishment.
Factum Foundation, in collaboration with the Peri Foundation and with the support of the Dagestan aul museum (Makhachkala), has created a copy of an 18th century tombstone from the remote mountain village of Kala-Koreysh, Dagestan. The tombstone was recorded using photogrammetry – a photographic 3D recording technique that can result in high-resolution data – and digitally carved in limestone to produce a beautiful object with material correspondence to the original.
When they first opened in 1873, the purpose of the Cast Courts was to display accurate copies of architectural and sculptural masterpieces from around the world. Over the course of the 20th century, the casts also acquired significant conservation value when a number of the original objects were lost or damaged. However, cast making has long been considered a destructive technique itself, and in the 21st century new non-contact technologies are finding their way into the Cast Courts.

Photo © courtesy of the Victoria & Albert Museum


Photogrammetry Training at Al-Ula
Photogrammetry Training at Al-Ula

In September 2018, Factum Foundation’s Otto Lowe spent two weeks in the town of Al-Ula, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, teaching a group of fifteen locals how to record cultural heritage in 3D using photogrammetry. A collaborative pilot project between the Factum Foundation, Art Jameel, and the Royal Commission of Al-Ula (RCU), the local students were first taught of the core concepts and technical processes behind photogrammetry then were able to practically apply this knowledge to the recording of three different petroglyph sites in the vicinity of Al-Ula. This educative initiative is one of the most significant in Factum Foundation’s recent efforts to support the dissemination of digital recording skills and technologies across Saudi Arabia.

Read more about it here.


Recording an avant-garde masterpiece
Recording an avant-garde masterpiece

Kazimir Malevich's Black Square, 1915 is regarded as the iconic painting of the Russian avant-garde. In March 2018, a Factum Foundation team were at the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow in order to fully record this delicate piece, as well as the 1929 reproduction created for a retrospective held at the gallery that year. The Lucida 3D scanner was employed to capture the intricacies of their surfaces, with this used alongside panoramic photography to achieve a comprehensive set of data that will aid further study of the mysterious work and ensure its longevity for generations to come.

Learn more.


Digital and physical reconstruction of the vandalised sacred cave of Kamukuwaká
Digital and physical reconstruction of the vandalised sacred cave of Kamukuwaká

The cave of Kamukuwaká, an important sacred petroglyph site representing the cosmogony of the inhabitants of Upper-Xingu (Mato Grosso, Brasil) and registered national monument has been intentionally destroyed. Culture is under threat and digitisation of Cultural Heritage is the most effective way to monitor its condition. Following the recording of the vandalised sacred cave, Factum Foundation is now working on its digital reconstruction in virtual and physical form.
This will lead to the creation of an exact physical facsimile of the cave, at a scale of 1:1, to be displayed at the first 'Pavilion of Indigenous People', at the garden of the Knights of Malta, 
during the 2019 Venice Biennale of Art.
Learn more.


Recording of the Al Ain Museum
Recording of the Al Ain Museum

In September 2018, a team from Factum Foundation travelled to the oasis city of Al Ain in the Abu Dhabi Emirate in order to record and digitise the exhibits of the Al Ain Museum. The museum, the oldest in the UAE, is being temporarily closed to allow its renovation and the construction of an additional museum building, with Factum commissioned by the Abu Dhabi Department for Culture and Tourism to document its variety of exhibits that focus on the ethnographic and archaeological history of the country so as to ensure their long-term protection.
Two forms of digitisation were conducted: an overall scan using a LiDAR laser scanner in addition to photogrammetry on individual exhibits to supplement the LiDAR data.
Read more.


© Copyright 2019 Factum Foundation | Privacy & Coockie Policies

This website uses cookies to improve your experience online. By using our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy & Coockie Policies. Close