News


total_registros:12
The Lucida Lab Milano recording J. B. Jackson's Chiaroscuro woodcuts
The Lucida Lab Milano recording J. B. Jackson's Chiaroscuro woodcuts

A team from the Lucida Lab Milano started the recording of J. B. Jackson's Chiaroscuro woodcuts, in Palazzo Sturm, Bassano del Grappa's Civic Museum. Palazzo Sturm is one of the few museums in Italy dedicated to showing every aspect of Remondini’s industrial process within the 16th and 17th centuries as well as the phases in the production of books, decorated papers, religious and popular print makings, games, optical views, etchings and woodcuts.

Read more about the Lucida Lab Milano.

Final Review session for the Advanced Preservation Technology Studio at Columbia University
Final Review session for the Advanced Preservation Technology Studio at Columbia University

In 2018, Adam Lowe and Carlos Bayod's course within GSAPP 's Studio on Advanced Preservation Technology programme, at Columbia University, was based on the application of non-contact digital recording systems within the frame of a fieldwork project: the documentation of the great Casa de Pilatos in Seville.

During an intensive 3-day session in October, the students carried out the recording of a selection of art and architecture elements throughout the building. The students had the opportunity to receive on-site training by scanning specialists from Factum Foundation, working in groups so as to obtain high quality information on the current conservation state of the palace.

The obtained data was processed by the students with the aim of generating virtual and physical outputs that could ultimately contribute to the appreciation and dissemination of Casa de Pilatos. During the final review that took place in December, the students presented their research on the conservation of tiles in Casa Pilatos. On this occasion, several renders, multi-layered online browsers, Océ elevated prints 3D models and milled relief prototypes were displayed at the University, along with the video made during the recording session in Seville.

In collaboration with Océ: digitising and rematerialising Rembrandt's ‘Portrait of an Elderly Man’
In collaboration with Océ: digitising and rematerialising Rembrandt's ‘Portrait of an Elderly Man’

Factum Foundation has combined with long-time collaborators Océ for the recording of a piece by the Dutch master Rembrandt, ‘Portrait of an Elderly Man’, held at the Mauritshuis Museum in The Hague, Netherlands. This extremely high-resolution, complete non-contact method will result in the creation of 3D reproductions of the painting using Océ's Elevated Printing Technology which will form part of the museum’s upcoming interactive exhibition ‘Rembrandt for Families’ (working title) launching next year.

Image © Clemens Weijkamp, Océ

Caravaggio's 'Nativity'
Caravaggio's 'Nativity'

In 2015, a facsimile created by the foundation's sister company Factum Arte of the renowned stolen work by the Italian master Caravaggio was unveiled in its original location at the Oratory of San Lorenzo in Palermo as part of the chapel's restoration.

The modern history and potential future of the lost piece is detailed in a new article from The Guardian featuring the facsimile and our director Adam Lowe that can be found here, whilst further information on Factum Arte's facsimile can be found here.

The Re-Opening of the Cast Courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London
The Re-Opening of the Cast Courts at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The Cast Courts at the V&A reopened this November following a long refurbishment.
Factum Foundation, in collaboration with the Peri Foundation and with the support of the Dagestan aul museum (Makhachkala), has created a copy of an 18th century tombstone from the remote mountain village of Kala-Koreysh, Dagestan. The tombstone was recorded using photogrammetry – a photographic 3D recording technique that can result in high-resolution data – and digitally carved in limestone to produce a beautiful object with material correspondence to the original.
When they first opened in 1873, the purpose of the Cast Courts was to display accurate copies of architectural and sculptural masterpieces from around the world. Over the course of the 20th century, the casts also acquired significant conservation value when a number of the original objects were lost or damaged. However, cast making has long been considered a destructive technique itself, and in the 21st century new non-contact technologies are finding their way into the Cast Courts.

Photo © courtesy of the Victoria & Albert Museum

Photogrammetry Training at Al-Ula
Photogrammetry Training at Al-Ula

In September 2018, Factum Foundation’s Otto Lowe spent two weeks in the town of Al-Ula, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, teaching a group of fifteen locals how to record cultural heritage in 3D using photogrammetry. A collaborative pilot project between the Factum Foundation, Art Jameel, and the Royal Commission of Al-Ula (RCU), the local students were first taught of the core concepts and technical processes behind photogrammetry then were able to practically apply this knowledge to the recording of three different petroglyph sites in the vicinity of Al-Ula. This educative initiative is one of the most significant in Factum Foundation’s recent efforts to support the dissemination of digital recording skills and technologies across Saudi Arabia.

Read more about it here.

Recording an avant-garde masterpiece
Recording an avant-garde masterpiece

Kazimir Malevich's Black Square, 1915 is regarded as the iconic painting of the Russian avant-garde. In March 2018, a Factum Foundation team were at the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow in order to fully record this delicate piece, as well as the 1929 reproduction created for a retrospective held at the gallery that year. The Lucida 3D scanner was employed to capture the intricacies of their surfaces, with this used alongside panoramic photography to achieve a comprehensive set of data that will aid further study of the mysterious work and ensure its longevity for generations to come.

Learn more.

Factum Foundation at the Protecting the Past Conference, Sharjah, December 2018
Factum Foundation at the Protecting the Past Conference, Sharjah, December 2018

On December 6th, the Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East & North Africa (EAMENA) Project invited Factum Foundation's director, Adam Lowe, and photogrammetry expert, Otto Lowe, to talk jointly with Art Jameel and the Royal Commission of Al Ula at the Protecting the Past Conference.
This is a series of talks and events aiming at finding efficient strategies for the future of cultural heritage preservation and building long-lasting partnerships within the MENA region by bringing together stakeholders from many different boards.

On this occasion, the three institutions also presented their latest collaboration: a project aiming at transferring technology and know-how to local communities by providing training in data capture and processing to a number of selected participants. The pilot of this series of training programs ran this past October, 2018 in Al Ula with sixteen students and resulted in the successful capturing of 74,000 images and over 1.29TB of data.

Click here for further information about this new collaboration.

Click here for further details about the conference.

Digital and physical reconstruction of the vandalised sacred cave of Kamukuwaká
Digital and physical reconstruction of the vandalised sacred cave of Kamukuwaká

The cave of Kamukuwaká, an important sacred petroglyph site representing the cosmogony of the inhabitants of Upper-Xingu (Mato Grosso, Brasil) and registered national monument has been intentionally destroyed. Culture is under threat and digitisation of Cultural Heritage is the most effective way to monitor its condition. Following the recording of the vandalised sacred cave, Factum Foundation is now working on its digital reconstruction in virtual and physical form.
This will lead to the creation of an exact physical facsimile of the cave, at a scale of 1:1, to be displayed at the first 'Pavilion of Indigenous People', at the garden of the Knights of Malta, 
during the 2019 Venice Biennale of Art.
Learn more.

Recording of the Al Ain Museum
Recording of the Al Ain Museum

In September 2018, a team from Factum Foundation travelled to the oasis city of Al Ain in the Abu Dhabi Emirate in order to record and digitise the exhibits of the Al Ain Museum. The museum, the oldest in the UAE, is being temporarily closed to allow its renovation and the construction of an additional museum building, with Factum commissioned by the Abu Dhabi Department for Culture and Tourism to document its variety of exhibits that focus on the ethnographic and archaeological history of the country so as to ensure their long-term protection.
Two forms of digitisation were conducted: an overall scan using a LiDAR laser scanner in addition to photogrammetry on individual exhibits to supplement the LiDAR data.
Read more.

Rebuilding the Heraclitus Vessel
Rebuilding the Heraclitus Vessel

Factum first got involved in the rebuilding of the ferro-concrete Research Vessel Heraclitus, a 25-metre long concrete Chinese junk that carried out important expeditions over 40 years and 270,000 nautical miles through six oceans, in 2014. Working alongside San Lab Projects from London, 3D visualisations of the hull were produced; first using the FARO scanner, and then, on returning in 2018, using LiDAR technology. This 3D model will provide further assistance to the rebuild project that aims to have the Heraclitus ready for her most ambitious voyage: a five-year Ethnosphere Expedition to West Africa, South America and the Caribbean, commencing in 2020.

Learn more.

'Saved by the Bell!' - The Resurrection of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry
'Saved by the Bell!' - The Resurrection of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry

Factum Foundation is launching a new initiative in partnership with The United Kingdom Historic Building Preservation Trust (UKHBPT) to resurrect the historic Whitechapel Bell Foundry as a working foundry for the 21st century. The WBF was acquired in 2017 and the manufacture of the bells which have continuously been made at the site since the reign of Elizabeth I ceased.

The Factum Foundation & UKHBPT proposal presents an innovative vision for the future of one of the United Kingdom's finest cultural and heritage assets, bringing internationally renowned artists and craftspeople together with the local community in an endeavour to ensure its future as an economically viable, environmentally sustainable and socially engaged space. The aim of the proposal document is to convince the current owners of the building, Raycliffe Whitechapel LLP, either to participate in the resurrection of the WBF, or to sell the property to allow this to happen.

Read the full proposal, prepared by Skene Catling de la Peña.

© Copyright 2019 Factum Foundation | Privacy & Coockie Policies

This website uses cookies to improve your experience online. By using our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy & Coockie Policies. Close